SEC Quarterly Meetings
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The Bay Area Social Equity Caucus convenes on a quarterly basis to explore regional issues impacting our local communities. These meetings are open to the public and provide an excellent opportunity for potential members and allies to learn more about the Caucus. The best way to find out about the next meeting, training or event is to sign-up for the E-newsletter and listserv.

Meetings take place on Fridays from 9:30 AM until 12:00 PM at the James Irvine Conference Center at the East Bay Community Foundation in Downtown Oakland.


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Upcoming and Recent Quarterly Meetings

 

Assessing the Redistricting Process: What It Means for Our Communities - SEC Fall Quarterly Meeting, Sept. 23, 2011

Redistricting Panel - 09.23.2011
California voters, frustrated with Sacramento’s political gridlock, twice went to the polls to divest elected officials of their authority to draw the state’s political districts. Voters granted that power instead to the citizens of California through the establishment of the 14-member, multipartisan Citizens Redistricting Commission.Barely one week after the Commission adopted 177 newly created state legislative, congressional, and Board of Equalization districts, equity-minded individuals and organizations are wondering whether this more transparent, public process will result in better representation for low-income people and communities of color.

On September 23, 2011, a panel of redistricting experts to discuss the following questions:

  • Why and how was the Citizens Redistricting Commission created?
  • How has this redistricting process differed from other processes?
  • How well were low-income people and communities of color represented?
  • What impact will the new maps have on the voice and political power of low-income people and communities of color over the next decade?
  • Should all levels of government enact similar redistricting reforms? And if so, how can processes be structured to maximize the political power of low-income people and communities of color?

Read the speakers' bios and hear the podcast of their presentation:

*Marqueece Harris-Dawson, President and CEO, Community Coalition of South Los Angeles
*Connie Galambos Malloy, Sr. Dir. of Programs, Urban Habitat and Commissioner, California Citizens Redistricting Commission
*Michelle Romero, Redistricting Fellow, The Greenlining Institute
*Paul Mitchell, Political Consultant and Owner, Redistricting Partners

Equitable Alternatives to AB 32's Cap-and-Trade Program: Summer Quarterly - June 10, 2011

Equitable Alternatives to AB 32's Cap-and-Trade Program

In 2006, environmental justice advocates helped pass California's first-ever climate change legislation (AB 32), which requires the state to reduce its greenhouse gas emissions to 1990 levels by the year 2020. The passing of AB 32 was a significant victory for environmental justice communities, and set a precedent for future federal legislation. However, in April of this year, environmental justice advocates won a federal lawsuit that brought the implementation of AB 32 to a halt, claiming that the California Air Resources Board (CARB) did not adequately evaluate alternatives to its proposed cap-and-trade program, which could disproportionally impact low-income communities and communities of color.

On June 10, 2011, environmental justice advocates, decision makers, and policy experts from throughout the Bay Area discussed AB 32, the lawsuit that halted its implementation, and identified equitable alternatives to CARB's cap-and-trade program. Chione Flegal, Senior Associate at PolicyLink and member of the CARB's Environmental Justice Advisory Committee (EJAC) shared the concerns and recommendations raised by the EJAC; Adrienne Bloch, Staff Attorney at Communities for a Better Environment and one of the lead attorneys in the aforementioned lawsuit provided an overview of the case and the opportunities it is providing environmental justice advocates; and Bob Allen, Director of Transportation Justice for Urban Habitat presented on challenges and opportunities of conducting an equity analysis. Other advocates from throughout the Bay Area were also on hand to provide updates on their environmental justice work as well.

Read the speakers' bios and hear the podcast of their presentation:

*Chione Flegal, Senior Associate, PolicyLink
*Adrienne Bloch, Staff Attorney, Communities for a Better Environment
*Bob Allen, Director of Transportation Justice, Urban Habitat

Preserving Affordable Housing and Preventing Displacement in the Current Budget: Spring Quarterly - March 25, 2011

Preserving Affordable Housing and Preventing Displacement in the Current Budget

In January of 2011, a small group of advocates, policy experts and decision-makers came together during Urban Habitat’s third annual “State of the Region” event to identify how to equitably implement transit-oriented development (TOD) projects throughout the Bay Area without displacing low-income communities of color. The preservation and continued building of affordable housing near existing or planned transit was identified as a critical step in preventing displacement. However, with much of the funding and many of the tools Bay Area cities rely on to incentivize the construction and preservation of affordable housing near transit in jeopardy, our regional anti-displacement work and affordable housing goals will become even harder to achieve.  

During this event, Mark Evanoff, Redevelopment Manager for Union City; Brian Cheu, Director of Community Development for San Francisco Mayor Ed Lee; Michelle Byrd, Deputy Director of Housing and Community Development for the City of Oakland; and Evelyn Stivers, Field Director for the Non-Profit Housing Association of Northern California discussed the potential impact local, state, and federal budget deficits could have on affordable housing and TOD and the policy options and strategies advocates could utilize to ensure the funding and tools used to incentivize the construction and preservation of affordable housing are preserved.

Read the speaker's bio and hear the podcast of their presentation:

*Mark Evanoff, Redevelopment Manager for Union City
*Brian Cheu, Director of Community Development for San Francisco Mayor Ed Lee
*Michelle Byrd, Deputy Director of Housing and Community Development for the City of Oakland
*Evelyn Stivers, Field Director for the Non-Profit Housing Association of Northern California

SB 375: Winter Quarterly - December 17, 2010

SB 375: Six Big Wins for Social Equity

In January of this year, a small group of advocates, policy experts and decision makers came together during the Second Annual Bay Area Social Equity Caucus (SEC) State of the Region event to identify and discuss the core equity issues associated with SB 375. During this event we identified what was at stake for low-income communities and communities of color in the planning processes of SB 375 and how we could potentially use SB 375 to shape development in the communities we represent in an equitable way. Please join us for the upcoming Social Equity Caucus Quarterly Meeting as we reconvene this group and include new voices from those working on SB 375 in the Bay Area.

This meeting will be useful for advocates and decision makers from all sectors, including community groups, labor groups, and city and local electeds, staff, and commissioners from around the Bay, and will include plenty of time for sharing and discussion. We ask that you come prepared to talk about your own work related to SB 375 or with questions about how to ensure that the ongoing SB 375 planning process takes into account the interests of the communities you represent.

Read the speaker's bio and hear the podcast of their presentation:


* Connie Galambos Malloy, Director of Programs, Urban Habitat
* Colin Miller, Climate Policy and Research Coordinator, Urban Habitat
* Lindsay Imai, Transportation and Housing Program Associate, Urban Habitat
* Richard Marcantonio, Managing Attorney, Public Advocates
* Robin Salsburg, Senior Staff Attorney, Public Health Law & Policy

Local Hire Campaigns: Fall Quarterly - September 10, 2010

Local Hire Campaigns: What's Happening
Right Now in the Bay Area

Local hire requirements in public and private projects can be a powerful means by which advocates and city and county governmental decision makers can work together to put local residents to work and influence socioeconomic equity.

In January of this year, a small group of advocates and decision makers came together during the Second Annual Social Equity Caucus State of the Region to share best practices, updates, and new strategies for winning strong local hire agreements and making sure that those agreements are effectively implemented, resourced, and supported.

This meeting is useful for advocates and decision makers from all sectors, including community groups, labor groups, and city and local electeds, staff, and commissioners from around the Bay. Many shared about their work related to local hire and others asked questions about how to move local hire campaigns for the communities they represent.

Read the speaker's bio and hear the podcast of their presentation:

* Juliet Ellis, San Francisco Public Utilities Commission and Executive Director of Urban Habitat, PUC and Urban Habitat
*
Joshua Arce, Executive Director, Brightline Defense Project
* John Brauer, Executive Director, The Workforce Collaborative
* Bernida Reagan, Director of Community and Client Relations, Merriwether Williams Insurance Services


SEC Quarterly Meetings