Assessing the Redistricting Process: What It Means for Our Communities - SEC Fall Quarterly Meeting, Sept. 23, 2011

Redistricting Panel - 09.23.2011
California voters, frustrated with Sacramento’s political gridlock, twice went to the polls to divest elected officials of their authority to draw the state’s political districts. Voters granted that power instead to the citizens of California through the establishment of the 14-member, multipartisan Citizens Redistricting Commission.Barely one week after the Commission adopted 177 newly created state legislative, congressional, and Board of Equalization districts, equity-minded individuals and organizations are wondering whether this more transparent, public process will result in better representation for low-income people and communities of color.

On September 23, 2011, a panel of redistricting experts to discuss the following questions:

  • Why and how was the Citizens Redistricting Commission created?
  • How has this redistricting process differed from other processes?
  • How well were low-income people and communities of color represented?
  • What impact will the new maps have on the voice and political power of low-income people and communities of color over the next decade?
  • Should all levels of government enact similar redistricting reforms? And if so, how can processes be structured to maximize the political power of low-income people and communities of color?

Read the speakers' bios and hear the podcast of their presentation:

*Marqueece Harris-Dawson, President and CEO, Community Coalition of South Los Angeles
*Connie Galambos Malloy, Sr. Dir. of Programs, Urban Habitat and Commissioner, California Citizens Redistricting Commission
*Michelle Romero, Redistricting Fellow, The Greenlining Institute
*Paul Mitchell, Political Consultant and Owner, Redistricting Partners

Resdistricting - 09.23.11
AttachmentSize
Q&A_Segment-pt1.mp341.78 MB
Q&A_Segment-pt2.mp339.49 MB